The ability to exploit the extraordinary properties of quantum mechanics in novel applications, such as a new generation of super-fast computers, seems to come closer following with recent breakthroughs by an international team led by researchers from the University of New South Wales.

quantum_dot1_inside

A colour-enhanced Scanning Electron Microscope image of a quantum dot

In the two breakthroughs, written up in the international journals Nano Letters and Applied Physics Letters, researchers have for the first time demonstrated two ways to deliberately place an electron in a nano-sized device on a silicon chip.

The achievements set the stage for the next crucial steps of being able to observe and then control the electron’s quantum state or “spin”, to create a quantum bit. Multiple quantum bits coupled together make up the processor of a quantum computer.

A graphic explaining the quantum dot

A graphic explaining the quantum dot

Professor Andrew Dzurak, the NSW Node Director of the Australian National Fabrication Facility at UNSW and Dr Andrea Morello, Manager of the Quantum Measurement and Control Chip Program at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computer Technology, were leaders in the breakthrough work.

Quantum computing’s power comes from the fact that electrons can have a “spin” pointing in one of two directions. The spin position can be used in the same way that zeroes and ones represent data in today’s computers.

However electrons can also hold intermediate spin positions, or quantum states, which is what gives quantum computing its power.

While today’s computers increase their power linearly with the number of bits added, quantum bits, when coupled together, can deliver an exponential increase in their ability to represent data.

The other leaders of the research team are Professor David Jamieson at the University of Melbourne, and Dr Mikko Möttönen at the Helsinki University of Technology. Students Wee Han Lim and Kuan Yen Tan have just completed their PhD degrees in the UNSW School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications.

 

6 Responses to Quantum Computing Closer To Reality

  1. Phil-Am OSI says:

    This is cool. thanks for this information.

  2. etechnology says:

    It make sense that next generation of computer are of nano technology

  3. The information shows that technology is developing every moment.

  4. terry fraser says:

    hi, once the people thought the world was flat,thats spooky action at a distance. Now to test a quantum computer effects must be measured,like what the equal measurement of the exact nano diameter of the andromeda galaxy in light years magnetisim,for the reseaon your measuring something thats not even in that part of the galaxy anymore ,its moved,just like electrons ,it should equate the magnetic feild of an atoms motion in a magnetic field as accurate to the galaxy to test the elements on the periodic table.To run simulations on computers using all the elements in the periodic table and comparing a transmition of readable data from GEOMETRIC FRACTALS ,this will give a visual photon application when freezing and using lasers to see the outcome operation on monitors.

  5. [...] we transition to atomic-scale devices, we are now entering a new paradigm where quantum mechanics promises a similar technological disruption. It is the promise of this future technology [...]

  6. [...] we transition to atomic-scale devices, we are now entering a new paradigm where quantum mechanics promises a similar technological disruption. It is the promise of this future technology [...]

Share Your Thoughts! Please Leave a Reply

Set your Twitter account name in your settings to use the TwitterBar Section.